Leading In Real Time

Session Descriptions

1. Styles at Work

The focus of this session is to first understand one’s style of working, its strengths and built in areas for development. Also addressed is identifying the work styles of others and adjust your style to be more effective. This session utilizes DiSC as an assessment tool and many of the other sessions weave individual style into them as an element of the workshop. For that reason this workshop is a prerequisite for most of the others.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Understand your own style of working

Identify the work styles of others

Adjust your style to be more effective

2. Respectful Conversations

The focus of this session is to be able to listen more effectively and have respectful conversations with everyone. In addition the issue of flexing one’s management style to be more effective in communications is addressed.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Identify the elements of a Respectful
Conversation

Listen respectfully in a conversation

Flex your DiSC style in conversations

3. Mastering Difficult Conversations

The focus of this highly interactive session is to be able to more effectively handle the difficult conversations that inevitably can come up in business situations.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Confidently prepare for a difficult conversation

Identify the factors that can make a conversation difficult

Flex your DiSC style in difficult conversations

Conduct a difficult conversation at work

4. Engaging Through Delegation

The focus of this session is to use delegation to increase Employee Engagement. The tools offered help to decide what to delegate and who to delegate it to. Developmental delegation and having the discussion are also covered.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Use delegation as a way to enrich the jobs of others

Decide which assignments to delegate

Decide to whom to delegate the assignments

Have an effective delegation discussion

5. Setting Compelling Goals

The focus of this session is to be able to create leverage one of the most powerful tool a manager has, compelling goals and interesting work assignments. Learn to write SMARTER goals as well as the best method for measuring any goal.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Create interesting and challenging goals

Write SMARTER goals

Sustain and maintain existing goals

Identify the best method for measuring any goal

6. Working In Real Time

The focus of this session is to use a Project Planning Situation/Simulation to practice all of the skills taught in the Employee Engagement sessions. Using of all of the tools and information discussed is integrated into the simulation.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Utilize DiSC tools to influence others

Delegate to a team member using the tools provided

Have respectful conversations

7. Hiring Great People

The focus of this session is how to use competencies in selection criteria and how to use behavioral interviewing techniques in an interview. Participants practice asking interview questions in a way that gets more information from the candidate.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Create an Effective Candidate Experience

Conduct an effective behavioral interview

Ask only questions that are legally allowed

Make an Informed Hiring Recommendation

8. The Art of Onboarding

The focus of this session is the importance of a structured Onboarding Process along with the key components necessary for the success of the process. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between a structured onboarding process and retention. As a part of this session, managers create an Onboarding Process they can use with their next hire.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Articulate the importance of Onboarding

View activities from the New Hire’s perspective

Clarify the role of Managers and HR in Onboarding

Design an Onboarding process for New Hires

9. Managing For Keeps

The focus of this session is the role of the manager in retention and the impact of their actions on whether people choose to stay or leave. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between employee engagement and retention. The session is filled with practical examples and tools to assess the risk of losing the best and brightest employees.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Explain the main reasons people quit a job

Articulate their role in retaining employees

Explain the main reasons people stay in a job

Effectively use the Tools of Retention

10. Managing Productivity During Change

The focus of this session is the dynamics of change and people’s predictable reactions to the ensuing transition that occurs. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the stages or phases of transition and mitigating the inevitable loss of productivity.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Articulate the triggers of organizational change

Explain how change works at work

Recognize reactions to change in you and others DiSC styles

Use techniques for managing results and productivity during change

11. Communicating Change

The focus of this session is the role of the manager in communicating change as well as the techniques of delivering a potentially difficult message. Also addressed are the communication requirements of each stage in the Change Curve with special emphasis and practice on delivering the message.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Explain the manager’s responsibilities in
communicating change

Effectively deliver a message about change

Adjust communication style based on the needs of DiSC styles during change

Adjust communication methods based on each stage of the Change Curve

12. Managing The Mess

The focus of this session is to use a simulation of a day in the life of a Manager in Change to practice all of the skills taught in the Managing During Change sessions. Use of all of the tools and information is integrated into the simulation.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Tell the difference between tasks that are urgent versus important

• Make better decisions during a day of change

• More effectively manage their way through a day of change

13. Role of the Manager

The focus of this session is to understand the Responsibilities and Expectations of the manager. The stages of a newly promoted manager’s transition are explored and discussed, as well as tools offered to assist in this somewhat predictable process.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Explain the stages of transitioning into a new management role

List the Responsibilities and Expectations of their role as a manager

Utilize techniques provided to assist in the transition process

14. Meetings, Meetings, Meetings

The focus of this session is meetings are where management work happens and things get decided. But if a gauge were visible and it calculated the actual cost of meetings in salaries and facilities, many meetings would not be held at all. Learn the fine art of the effective use of meetings.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Determine when to have a meeting and when it is not required

Create an appropriate structure for each meeting

Use participants in different roles in the meeting

Utilize techniques to manage the participant interactions in the meeting

15. Managing Your Manager

The focus of this session is the relationship that the manager has with their boss is as critical as any to their success and is often overlooked. This relationship is based on three core components to making it successful; understanding working styles, the need for interdependence and interlocking goal alignment.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Define your manager’s working DiSC style

Articulate the goals of their manager

Define a next step for improving the working relationship

16. The Manager Coach

The focus of this session is the role of manager as coach and just what that entails. It is a total repackaging of the manager’s role. Effective managers today see themselves more as coaches than as the decision makers of old. This is why managers need to be coaches. Coaching is a tool for facilitating good decisions and not simply for developing people.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Define their role in terms of what is the coaching that is required

Identify the attributes of great coaches they have worked for in the past

Identify where certain DiSC styles help and hinder as a coach

Utilize specific techniques in a coaching discussion

17. Review Writing

The focus of this session is review writing. Even though it is only a small part of your entire performance management responsibility, it is often the part that Managers dislike the most. The session is filled with practical examples and tools to assist in making this a much easier and more useful process.

After this workshop participants will be able to:

Evaluate employees against their job description, accomplishments, and competencies, to an overall rating.

Use a consistent process to evaluate employees and discuss their performance

Engage in a meaningful dialogue and performance feedback.

Working Knowledge Delivered

SLOPPY Goals

Apr. 9th, 2013

SLOPPY goal is an acronym for the type of goal that we’ve all been given and maybe even given out to others. It’s a goal that is: Senseless Limitless Obscure Pointless Painful, and You have to do it anyway! “Just fix it!” How many times have we heard that in the course of day-to-day business? This type of SLOPPY goal is likely to get a result that falls short of any unstated expectations. Given the incredible power that setting goals has for individuals and organizations, it’s surprising that it is so often overlooked as something to teach and develop. Instead, it’s just assumed that all managers are good at goal setting and that it comes to people naturally. Since all anyone in business is looking for is clarity and direction from Senior Management—and all Senior Management wants is flexibility and goal attainment from employees—we ought to be better at this! Take a look at the two fundamental parts of an effective goal. A goal should tell you where you are going and what success looks like when you get there. It’s no more complicated than that. To keep your goals from being labeled SLOPPY, first answer the question, “What do I want to have happen?” If reducing expenses is something that is required of your business, simply insisting that, “We must reduce expenses” is by itself a SLOPPY goal. It needs a lot more definition. But if you add the second part by explaining what success looks like—“We must reduce marketing expenses by 10%” the goal turns into something much more actionable. So the next time you set or get a SLOPPY goal, “Just fix it!” by asking: What needs to happen? What does success look like?